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“Glass Ceiling” by Daniel Watson

When software engineers talk about Design Patterns, they usually talk about established and reusable constructs or architectures that address specific problems. For the most part, Design Patterns are defined independently of programming languages. If you are new to programming, you probably still don’t know what I am talking about. Anyway, you probably used a Design Pattern at some point without knowing it. In the following, I introduce five Design Patterns that every Software Engineer should know about.

Who creates and who uses Design Patterns?

Well, everyone can. If we take a brief look into the history of Design Patterns, we will find out that it originates back to Christopher Alexander, an architect who wrote articles and books like “The Pattern of Streets” or “A Pattern Language” in which he talks about actual architectural concepts, materials, and tools. …


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Macbook Beside Notebook — Negative Space from Pexels.com

Do you have an application landscape with different clients that have different responsibilities? For instance, you have a web page and an app with different users and different access rights to your API. If you happen to have very many different calls, it gets tricky for the developers to keep track of which call is meant for which application and users. In this article, I present my solution that helped the developers in my team a lot.

In case you are a bit lost and/or didn’t read my previous article about Generating Swagger Code for your flutter app, I described how to set up Swagger in your AspNet Core application to easily generate the client code for your flutter app. …


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This story tackles a rather common use case where you have a client-server application that communicates using an API. If you write both the client and the server, it feels very unnecessary and redundant to build all the models twice (or even more if you have different client implementations) and have to manually update the API changes. Doing this by hand is also very prone to errors. A nice way to automate this is to write the API once and generate the respective client code.

The setup in this tutorial

I implemented the sample API using Microsoft’s .Net Core 3. It is extremely fast, easy to learn, and well-documented and I am grateful that I can finally work with a type-safe language again. …

About

Martin Leuckert

Leading Backend Developer at neotiv GmbH

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